Dating of turkana boy

Lordkipanidze and his colleagues say that the new skull supports the idea that the many species of hominin thought to have coexisted during this period are, in fact, a single species, H.

erectus, which is simply more variable in appearance than previously thought.

Since this bone was so similar to a modern human femur, Dubois decided that the individual to which it belonged must have walked erect.

Together, the skulls point to a radical idea, according to David Lordkipanidze of the Georgian National Museum in Tbilisi, who led the study.

The researchers chiseled away chunks of the mudstone at Kokiselei to later analyze the periodic polarity reversals and come up with ages.

At Lamont-Doherty’s Paleomagnetics Lab, they compared the magnetic intervals with other stratigraphic records to date the archeological site to 1.76 million years.

An entire skull belonging to an extinct hominin that lived 1.8 million years ago has been found in Georgia – the earliest completely preserved specimen ever found and confirmation that the species it belonged to, Homo erectus was far more variable in appearance than originally thought.

So much so, in fact, that its discoverers argue that the ancient human family tree should be pruned of many of its species, which may simply be different forms of H. “It’s the most complete skull of an adult from this date,” says Marcia Ponce de León of the Anthropological Institute and Museum in Zurich, Switzerland, who studied the fossil.

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